Family Definition Research

The phrase family originates from its Latin term “familia.” Familia means household, which designates a crew of persons living under one roof and one head. It resonates with the Roman definition, “everyone in household” which includes, adopted adults, proper children, personal assistants, and slaves of different ages. It is evident that family has continually incorporated other people now not related by blood.
Majority of people recognize family as a group of people that contain of children, parents and their relatives. It is evident that every person holds a one of a kind definition of family. However, the difference observed in words used, however the core importance remains the same. David Dobbs talks about two types of children: “orchids” and “dandelions,” in his writings “The Science of Success” Dandelion children tend to do pretty well irrespective of the environment they are raised up grow up. Orchid children, on the other hand, tend to develop behavior or mood problems in abusive environments, but when raised in a good environment they became successful compared to the dandelions. The difference between dandelions and orchid children, however, may be genetic according to the new research. For example, kids with a certain variant of a dopamine-processing gene are at greater risk of ADHD and “externalizing behavior” (i.e., “acting out”) than other children. But in one study, these children also show a great improvement in response to a video-based behavioral intervention than did children who lacked at-risk variant.

Rhesus monkeys similarly, with another gene variant (one associated with depression in humans) are not good at processing serotonin than their peers if they are raised as orphans. But when raised by a loving monkey mother, these seemingly at-risk animals process serotonin more efficiently than other monkeys and are also more socially successful. These and other studies suggest that certain genes confer not risk per se, but a kind of openness to environmental stimuli, positive or negative.

Dobbs spends a considerable amount of time talking about the population-level implications of this new idea. He argues “that a genetic trait tremendously maladaptive in one situation can prove highly adaptive in another” and that “every society needs individuals with different types of behaviors. Some people may be aggressive, stubborn, restless, submissive, hyper-and even more morose, .other people may be violent, irritable, or outright. Basing arguments on the orchid hypothesis is then an inference can be made that individuals who react extremely strongly to their environment, even if these reactions seem negative to our modern eyes, may be important to the flexibility and survival of our species. But what I found most interesting about Dobbs’s piece was its implications for the individual. Dobbs writes of his decision to get tested for a gene variant that increases depression risk but may also confer orchid-like properties.

Orchid Hypothesis Concept.

The orchid hypothesis from Dobbs the science of success refers to a theory suggesting that the environment in which one is raised will influence their success in life. He attempts to liken humans to a group of flowers called orchids that only blossom in certain environmental conditions.According to this theory, individuals may have been born with different characters and have the ability succeed in life, but if they are exposed to an abusive environment, their success is diminished.The hypothesis suggests that ones genetic composition has little influence future activities of an individual.

Argument Against Orchid hypothesi

If the orchid hypothesis is true, then people like Dobbs may possess a plasticity that makes them more vulnerable to sorrow and yet also more capable of change. This would have enormous implications for those suffering from certain mental ailments. Perhaps along with their difficulties, their genes have granted them a tool for solving them and beyond that, for reaching new heights of personal fulfillment. It would also have an impact on how we raise and teach kids. Some have already speculated that children with ADHD need something different from the same system of educational model. If it’s true that environment uniquely influences some children, then maybe what we need is not to try to make them more like other children the current approach but rather to construct the environment that will best help them thrive. This is likely to be difficult, and expensive, and for these reasons, it may not catch on. But we might have much to gain, both as individuals and as a society, by seeing a springboard where we once saw a trapdoor

Orchid theory puts nurture ahead of nature, in the old age debate and indicate that parents play a fundamental role in their children success. However, according to the lab research as discussed in the science of success, parenting has no role in the changing of the genetic composition of children, Dobbs (2009). For instance, parenting can’t change your baby’s hair or eye color. From the lab a research a combination of one’s genetic composition and the environment one is nurtured will contribute the success of children, meaning the orchid hypothesis is merely a theory which is not practical in real life situation. Exposure to stress and adversity in childhood when you have a particular genotype puts you at greater risk for adverse outcomes. At the same time what we’re discovering is those same genotypes, under really great nurturing environmental conditions, produce excellent outcomes in children, Dobbs (2009).

The genotype of dandelion children is unique protective and the environment does very little to influence their success. They tend to do well irrespective of the environmental conditions that they are subjected to. A child who is hyperactive like an orchid, if not comforted well, and their stress responded to and addressed moderated, they can have a lot of behavioral problems later on as they may have mental health concerns later in life. In my own opinion, individuals who end leading a poor life are the orchids.However if the orchard children are exposed to a better environment and nurtured well, where their concerns and stress addressed, they do extremely well, as their genetic composition adapts to their environment.

In this early age of genetic testing, it’s easy to think of genes simplistically, and since most testing is still meant to predict disease, our genotypes sometimes begin to seem like maps full of danger signs. But human beings (and monkeys, too) are extraordinarily complicated, and what seems like a risk may also be a blessing. We still tend to see depression, anxiety, ADHD, and other mood and behavioral abnormalities as defects if a child is “at risk” for one of these, she needs to be protected as though from a gathering storm. To be at risk may also be to have a unique opportunity.

These high-sensitivity kids, if they grow up in an environment where it’s dog-eat-dog survival, what do you do? You grow up to be that fighter. Or that withdrawer. But it’s adaptation to survive in that environment. In today’s environment, we don’t want people to grow up to be aggressive or withdrawn and depressed. We want people to be highly engaged.

With orchid-children, the best thing is to nurture them and hand control their stress up to a certain point in life where they can survive on their own. Parents there act as stress response systems to their children. Parenting sometimes, however, may overcome a genetic predisposition. A child who starts a new schooling life in a daycare and seems stressed up, a parent can do certain things that may aid to release the kid’s stress. By staying a little bit longer at the daycare and picking them earlier in the day will make them relax. The way parents protect their your children from having a chronic stress response is to simply pay attention to your baby and respond in a way that’s going to make them more comfortable.

Work Cited

Dobbs, David. “The science of success.” Atlantic Magazine (2009).

David Dobbs talks about two types of children: “orchids” and “dandelions,” in his writings “The Science of Success” Dandelion children tend to do pretty well irrespective of the environment they are raised up grow up. Orchid children, on the other hand, tend to develop behavior or mood problems in abusive environments, but when raised in a good environment they became successful compared to the dandelions. The difference between dandelions and orchid children, however, may be genetic according to the new research. For example, kids with a certain variant of a dopamine-processing gene are at greater risk of ADHD and “externalizing behavior” (i.e., “acting out”) than other children. But in one study, these children also show a great improvement in response to a video-based behavioral intervention than did children who lacked at-risk variant.

Rhesus monkeys similarly, with another gene variant (one associated with depression in humans) are not good at processing serotonin than their peers if they are raised as orphans. But when raised by a loving monkey mother, these seemingly at-risk animals process serotonin more efficiently than other monkeys and are also more socially successful. These and other studies suggest that certain genes confer not risk per se, but a kind of openness to environmental stimuli, positive or negative.

Dobbs spends a considerable amount of time talking about the population-level implications of this new idea. He argues “that a genetic trait tremendously maladaptive in one situation can prove highly adaptive in another” and that “every society needs individuals with different types of behaviors. Some people may be aggressive, stubborn, restless, submissive, hyper-and even more morose, .other people may be violent, irritable, or outright. Basing arguments on the orchid hypothesis is then an inference can be made that individuals who react extremely strongly to their environment, even if these reactions seem negative to our modern eyes, may be important to the flexibility and survival of our species. But what I found most interesting about Dobbs’s piece was its implications for the individual. Dobbs writes of his decision to get tested for a gene variant that increases depression risk but may also confer orchid-like properties.

Orchid Hypothesis Concept.

The orchid hypothesis from Dobbs the science of success refers to a theory suggesting that the environment in which one is raised will influence their success in life. He attempts to liken humans to a group of flowers called orchids that only blossom in certain environmental conditions.According to this theory, individuals may have been born with different characters and have the ability succeed in life, but if they are exposed to an abusive environment, their success is diminished.The hypothesis suggests that ones genetic composition has little influence future activities of an individual.

Argument Against Orchid hypothesi

If the orchid hypothesis is true, then people like Dobbs may possess a plasticity that makes them more vulnerable to sorrow and yet also more capable of change. This would have enormous implications for those suffering from certain mental ailments. Perhaps along with their difficulties, their genes have granted them a tool for solving them and beyond that, for reaching new heights of personal fulfillment. It would also have an impact on how we raise and teach kids. Some have already speculated that children with ADHD need something different from the same system of educational model. If it’s true that environment uniquely influences some children, then maybe what we need is not to try to make them more like other children the current approach but rather to construct the environment that will best help them thrive. This is likely to be difficult, and expensive, and for these reasons, it may not catch on. But we might have much to gain, both as individuals and as a society, by seeing a springboard where we once saw a trapdoor

Orchid theory puts nurture ahead of nature, in the old age debate and indicate that parents play a fundamental role in their children success. However, according to the lab research as discussed in the science of success, parenting has no role in the changing of the genetic composition of children, Dobbs (2009). For instance, parenting can’t change your baby’s hair or eye color. From the lab a research a combination of one’s genetic composition and the environment one is nurtured will contribute the success of children, meaning the orchid hypothesis is merely a theory which is not practical in real life situation. Exposure to stress and adversity in childhood when you have a particular genotype puts you at greater risk for adverse outcomes. At the same time what we’re discovering is those same genotypes, under really great nurturing environmental conditions, produce excellent outcomes in children, Dobbs (2009).

The genotype of dandelion children is unique protective and the environment does very little to influence their success. They tend to do well irrespective of the environmental conditions that they are subjected to. A child who is hyperactive like an orchid, if not comforted well, and their stress responded to and addressed moderated, they can have a lot of behavioral problems later on as they may have mental health concerns later in life. In my own opinion, individuals who end leading a poor life are the orchids.However if the orchard children are exposed to a better environment and nurtured well, where their concerns and stress addressed, they do extremely well, as their genetic composition adapts to their environment.

In this early age of genetic testing, it’s easy to think of genes simplistically, and since most testing is still meant to predict disease, our genotypes sometimes begin to seem like maps full of danger signs. But human beings (and monkeys, too) are extraordinarily complicated, and what seems like a risk may also be a blessing. We still tend to see depression, anxiety, ADHD, and other mood and behavioral abnormalities as defects if a child is “at risk” for one of these, she needs to be protected as though from a gathering storm. To be at risk may also be to have a unique opportunity.

These high-sensitivity kids, if they grow up in an environment where it’s dog-eat-dog survival, what do you do? You grow up to be that fighter. Or that withdrawer. But it’s adaptation to survive in that environment. In today’s environment, we don’t want people to grow up to be aggressive or withdrawn and depressed. We want people to be highly engaged.

With orchid-children, the best thing is to nurture them and hand control their stress up to a certain point in life where they can survive on their own. Parents there act as stress response systems to their children. Parenting sometimes, however, may overcome a genetic predisposition. A child who starts a new schooling life in a daycare and seems stressed up, a parent can do certain things that may aid to release the kid’s stress. By staying a little bit longer at the daycare and picking them earlier in the day will make them relax. The way parents protect their your children from having a chronic stress response is to simply pay attention to your baby and respond in a way that’s going to make them more comfortable.

Work Cited

Dobbs, David. “The science of success.” Atlantic Magazine (2009).

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