“Race, Restrictive State Abortion Laws, and Abortion Demand”

“Race, Restrictive State Abortion Laws, and Abortion Demand,” by Marshal H. Medoff. 225–240 in Review of Black Political Economy, vol. 41, no. 2, 2014, pp. 225–240.
I read a scholarly journal on the racial attitude toward abortion to perform my study on the attitude toward abortion based on the ethnicity of the respondents. The study’s original goal was to see how state abortion laws influenced abortion claims differently among black, white, and Hispanic women. According to the findings of the study, the state’s restrictions on Medicaid abortion funding substantially decreased rates of abortion among the three races. However, the number of abortion cases among Hispanic women reduced rapidly after the restrictions on medical funding compared to black and white women. The study also identified that parental guidance and mandatory counseling programs had relatively no noteworthy effects concerning reduction abortion rates amongst the black, Hispanic, and white women. It was also noted that two-visits regulations were directly connected to a real decrease in abortion rates particularly in the white women, but unfortunately, applications of the laws had no significant impacts on the abortion rate amongst the black and Hispanic women. This research contains enough information required to understand the racial views regarding abortion. It can be applied by the law and policy makers in designing the restrictions on abortion that cut across all the races to reduce unwarranted abortions among a given race.

Pérez, G., D. Ruiz-Muñoz, M. Gotsens, M. C. Cases, and M. Rodríguez-Sanz. “Social and Economic Inequalities in Induced Abortion in Spain as a Function of Individual and Contextual Factors.” European Journal of Public Health, vol. 24, no. 1, 2014, pp. 162-9.

I was determined to identify the socioeconomic differences in shaping the individuals’ attitude on the issue of abortion. And in the process of conducting my research, I identified a study which was aimed to examine the socioeconomic differences in the rate of carrying out induced abortion in Spain by analyzing both regional and individual socioeconomic distinctiveness. The scope of the study covered all the women living in Spain putting into consideration the hierarchical structure of social and economic factors. The research was conducted on both personal and regional level, and it also involved calculations to determine risks related to induced abortions and the level of confidence when conducting abortions. The results indicated that six women in every a thousand group of women between the age of 24-40 years conducted abortions and also it was noted that the cases of frequent induced abortions were mostly identified particularly in the younger women of 20-24 years old who could not afford the university education. A significant rate of induced abortions was established especially amongst the women dwelling in the places where there is always low public expenditure, particularly on non-university education. Also, higher percentages of non-European women were found to be more likely to have induced abortions due to their low socioeconomic status. Moreover, the analysis identified that abortions are more rampant especially among the poor and unmarried women. In my research, I realized that over 41% pregnancies are unintended amongst the individuals with low socioeconomic status and 60% of these pregnancies end up being aborted. This paper entails the information required to explain how people from different socioeconomic classes view the issue of abortion, and also to explain why the cases of rampant executions of induced abortions are more likely to be reported from the people of low socioeconomic status. This paper can be used by the government especially when making their budget in order to allocate more resources to regions or people who are disadvantaged socially and economically with the aim of reducing abortion cases attached to low socioeconomic status.

Potter, Joseph E., Kate Coleman-Minahan, Kari White, Daniel A. Powers, Chloe Dillaway, Amanda J. Stevenson, Kristine Hopkins, Daniel Grossman. “Women’s Knowledge of and Support for Abortion Restrictions in Texas: Findings from a Statewide Representative Survey.” PSRH Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, vol. 48, no. 4, 2016, pp. 189-197.

In my research, I was determined to identify whether the level of the knowledge acquired by the respondents who in this case are the women impacted by the rate of abortions in the United States of America. The level of these women’s health awareness determines at higher percentage the possibility of carrying out abortion. In the year 2014 and 2015, women’s knowledge of particular abortions restrictions and the laws including the reasons behind their support for the laws was assessed. Approximately 780 women participated in an online survey in the state of Texas concerning the abortion laws passed in Texas. It was realized that only 31% of respondents supported the laws while 36% indicated that they were not aware of the restrictions while 19% supported the requirements. It was also noted that women with low education attainment especially those who do not have university education did not understand that these laws encouraged safer abortions and therefore did not vote for the laws. It was also realized that women with low education levels did not see abortion as the big deal and in fact, it was found that abortions were more rampant especially among the women with low education attainment. This paper is full of the relevant information that can help one to identify how people with different educational attainment view the abortion issues, whereby the research paper points out that, people with less knowledge are more likely to carry out abortion. Therefore, this paper can be applied in designing strategies required to spread knowledge amongst the women in the country.

Rodriguez-Alvarez, Elena, Luisa N. Borrell, Yolanda González-Rábago. Unai Martín Nerea Lanborena. “Induced Abortion in a Southern European Region: Examining Inequalities between Native and Immigrant Women.” Int J Public Health International Journal of Public Health : International Journal of Public Health, vol. 61, no. 7, 2016, pp. 829-836.

While conducting my research on the racial views toward the issue of abortion I came across this journal which concerns with examining the induced abortion dissimilarity between the indigenous and immigrant women particularly in southern European part and also whether these variations are facilitated by induced abortion laws set on 2010. Two analyses were performed, and the first analysis was conducted to determine the total numbers of induced abortions of the native and the migrant women. The second study was carried out by performing a log-binomial regression technique to quantify the relationship between the place of birth and origin with the repeat of induced abortions among the native black, white and immigrant women. The results indicated that immigrants were most likely to perform induced abortions compared to any other Spanish women. However, women from sub-Saharan Africa had the highest probability to have an induced abortion. It was also noted that immigrant women coming from different countries apart from Asia had a higher likelihood of repeating induced abortion compared to Hispanic women. Further, Central American women and Caribbean women were also more likely to conduct induced abortions. This paper contains the necessary information that is required to explain individual attitudes towards the issue of abortion depending on their race or origin. This paper can help the people involved in coming up with the ways of trying to change the ideologies of individuals from certain races identified as the most likely to commit abortion.

Hypotheses

1. Inexplicably abortion cases are highest amongst the black and Hispanic women compared to white.

2. Abortion rates are highest among the women with low socioeconomic status in the society.

3. Knowledge gaps regarding educational attainment amongst women largely shape the attitude of women towards abortion.

Works Cited

Medoff, Marshal H. “Race, Restrictive State Abortion Laws and Abortion Demand.” Rev. Black Polit. Econ. Review of Black Political Economy, vol. 41, no. 2, 2014, pp. 225–240.

Pérez, G., D. Ruiz-Muñoz, M. Gotsens, M. C. Cases, and M. Rodríguez-Sanz. “Social and Economic Inequalities in Induced Abortion in Spain as a Function of Individual and Contextual Factors.” European Journal of Public Health, vol. 24, no. 1, 2014, pp. 162-9.

Potter, Joseph E., Kate Coleman-Minahan, Kari White, Daniel A. Powers, Chloe Dillaway, Amanda J. Stevenson, Kristine Hopkins, Daniel Grossman. “Women’s Knowledge of and Support for Abortion Restrictions in Texas: Findings from a Statewide Representative Survey.” PSRH Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, vol. 48, no. 4, 2016, pp. 189-197.

Rodriguez-Alvarez, Elena, Luisa N. Borrell, Yolanda González-Rábago. Unai Martín Nerea Lanborena. “Induced Abortion in a Southern European Region: Examining Inequalities between Native and Immigrant Women.” Int J Public Health International Journal of Public Health : International Journal of Public Health, vol. 61, no. 7, 2016, pp. 829-836.

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