Social Reformer and Women’s Rights Activist, Susan B Anthony

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Social reformer and women’s rights activist Susan B. Anthony played a pivotal role in the women’s suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family, she began collecting anti-slavery petitions at a young age. As a teenager, she went on to become an important social reformer and women’s rights advocate. In fact, Anthony’s anti-slavery campaign led to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920.

Susan Brownell Anthony
Susan Brownell Anthony II was an American journalist, activist, and substance abuse counselor. Born in Easton, Pennsylvania, Anthony attended the University of Rochester before graduating from college in 1938. As a student, Anthony supported pacifism and the anti-fascist movement, as well as housing desegregation and childcare centers for working mothers. She eventually obtained her master’s degree in political science from American University.

While her early life was marred by abuse, Anthony emerged as a national hero in the late 1890s. She traveled to the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 and the Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, Oregon in 1905. She helped organize the first delegation of the United States to the International Council of Women in 1899 and helped found the organization in 1888. She subsequently retired from the National American Woman Suffrage Association in 1900, and died in 1906. The Nineteenth Amendment was not passed until 209 years after her death.

Social reformer
Born in 1821, Susan Anthony began her activism as a young woman after her father started an abolitionist movement. Her father sent Anthony to boarding school run by the Quakers. She completed her education in 1839 and became a teacher at Canajoharie Academy in Rochester. At this time, teaching was a good career option for young women, but she soon resigned her post and began managing her parents’ farm outside of Rochester. As a result, she became familiar with an extensive network of social reformers and began her activism and writings.

In the late 1850s, Anthony organized a petition drive to have lawmakers in Albany, New York, consider a bill that would grant women the right to vote and own property. She visited sixty voting districts to spread her message, speaking to women’s groups and recruiting others to join her campaign. In 1869, her efforts were rewarded with a law that granted women the right to vote, sign contracts, and have legal guardianship over their own children. This legislation was considered extremely radical at the time, but Anthony’s tireless work helped lead to its passage.

Women’s rights activist
American social reformer and Women’s rights activist, Susan B. Anthony, was pivotal to the women’s suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family that advocated for social equality, she began to collect anti-slavery petitions at age seventeen. By the age of twenty-one, she was collecting thousands of signatures. At age 25, she became president of the American Civil Liberties Union, an organization devoted to achieving equal rights for women.

A strong leader and strategist, Anthony was instrumental in the suffrage movement. Together with Elizabeth Stanton, she founded the American Equal Rights Association and the Women’s Loyal National League. The women’s suffrage movement grew and Susan B. Anthony became famous in the United States, where she lectured and organized to raise money for the newspaper. Her steadfastness to her cause earned her the respect of many people, although she did encounter some opposition.

Mother of suffrage campaigner
If you’re a fan of suffrage history, then you know the name Susan Anthony, Mother of suffrage campaigns. But what did she really do to bring about women’s suffrage? The Mother of suffrage campaigner was a woman who championed temperance, abolition, and equal pay for equal work. She traveled with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and gave speeches in support of women’s suffrage.

After a long and arduous campaign against sex discrimination, Anthony helped merge the two largest suffrage groups. She served as president of the National American Women’s Suffrage Association until her death in 1906, fourteen years before women gained the right to vote with the passage of the 19th Amendment. She had been a staunch abolitionist from her early years, and fought against the segregation of children.

Influence of temperance movement
The influence of the temperance movement on Susan B. Anthony’s life can be traced back to the 1850s when she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Anthony and Stanton met through temperance circles and founded the Woman’s New York State Temperance Society. However, Anthony was denied the right to speak at a state convention of the Sons of Temperance in Albany. The petition, which had received over 28,000 signatures from women, was rejected, and Susan B. Anthony resigned from the organization.

After Anthony had become an activist, she worked to improve the lives of women. She was an advocate for women’s rights and a lifelong friend of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Together, they presented the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments to the Seneca Falls Convention in upstate New York, which kicked off the women’s rights movement. Frederick Douglass and social reformer Lucretia Mott were present.

Influence of women’s rights movement
The woman who was the most influential figure in the women’s right movement is none other than Susan B. Anthony. Born in 1820, Anthony was raised in the Quaker religion. Her father, Read Anthony, believed that all children should be educated and opened a home school for his daughters. Susan completed her education at age seventeen and began a career as a teacher. She was dismissed from her first job because of a wage dispute, believing that she was paid only one-fifth of the pay that her male counterparts received.

Despite the challenges, Anthony remained committed to her cause, and eventually won the right to vote. She joined the women’s rights movement when she met abolitionist Lucy Stone at a Syracuse convention. During her tenure as an agent of the American Anti-Slavery Society, she faced hostile mobs and armed threats. She was also dragged through the streets of Syracuse.

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