Retirement Program

Retirement community housing complex hosts older adults with the ability to care for themselves. In some communities, however, the domestic care agencies offer care, socialization, and bodily activities. The age-qualified and age-restricted is one of the characteristics of the retirement communities. The elderly wishes exercises to keep suit and healthy. The fit and Strong Program plays an essential part in making sure that the aged people remain sturdy and active. The program combines strength training, frequent flexibility, aerobics and walking with health professionals
However, the aged faces several barriers to bodily activities. The elderly fear falling due to vulnerable bodies and imbalance. Therefore, the attitude creates bad temperament towards exercising and do not make activities as part of the lifestyle. It is important to have an appropriate screening before starting physical activity among the elderly. The strategies assist in assuring that the elderly are engaged in safe physical activities programs. Finally, the retirement community can use upper-body flexibility distance walking, body mass index, depression, and quality of life to measure physical activity outcomes.

Physical Activity Program Proposal

Introduction

Retirement community housing complex hosts older adults with the ability to care for themselves. In some communities, however, the home care agencies offer care, socialization, and physical activities. The age-qualified and age-restricted is one of the characteristics of the retirement communities (Noice et al 2014). The residents must be fully or partially retired where the retirement community offers shared amenities and services.

The physical activity is the body movement produced by skeletal muscles resulting in energy usage limiting the impact of age-related biological changes through effects on chronic disease developing and delivering functional capacity. The extensive epidemiological and intervention studies indicate that continuous activity (PA) assists maintain physical function thus avoid disability at a later stage of life. Exercises had significant benefits in balance, gait speed and daily activities. A higher percentage older than 65 are not inactive and not able to meet recommended levels of physical activity. Things get worse for the 80 and older people as their body lack energy and resist exercises. Age-related losses in cardiovascular functions are minimized using aerobic exercises. Endurance-training have some effect on elderly people’s resting heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and oxygen consumption (Noice et al 2014). The elderly have the ability to improve aerobic capacity within six months through regular aerobic exercises. Inevitably, the age leads to muscle decrement in neuromuscular, strength and cardiovascular. According to McArdle (2011), physical activity slows functional capacity in aging and disuse.

Population’s Barriers to Activity

There are several barriers to exercise among the elderly population including fear of injury, social isolation, and discomfort (Costello et al. 2011). The elderly fear falling due to weak bodies and imbalance. Therefore, the attitude creates negative temperament towards exercising and do not make activities as part of the lifestyle. There is misconception that older women are not supposed to exercise and thus do not enroll in physical activity programs. The elderly lack confidence and the belief that exercising is good in an essential factor influencing the lack of physical activity. The elderly often experience discomfort and pain on the knee soreness, lower-back pain, lung disorders and heart diseases (Costello et al. 2011). The obese and overweight increase the chances of being inactive. The lack of exercising facilities and harsh climatic conditions in many parts of the world limits exercises among the older adults. Older people cannot exercise on their own and have a training team or partners makes exercising more fun. Isolated elderly men and women have no motivation to exercises and may never be aware of the different ways to remain active.

Safe Screening Tool

It is important to have an appropriate screening before starting physical activity among the elderly. The strategies assist in assuring that the elderly are engaged in safe physical activities programs. The programs aim at optimizing function and the overall status of health that prevents further injuries to weakening bodies. The Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) 34 will be an important tool in the retirement community and clinical practice. The PAR-Q focus on symptoms, medical history and the cardiovascular risk factors associated with physical activities. The tool guides the elderly towards the safe exercise programs (Screening for and Prescribing Exercise for Older Adults, 2006).

Physical Program

The fit and Strong Program plays an important part in making sure that the elderly people remain strong and active. The program combines strength training, common flexibility, aerobics and walking with health professionals (Edwards & Leicht, 2014). Additionally, the program promotes behavior change among elderly population especially individuals with lower extremity osteoarthritis. There are many providers of the Fit and Strong program across the country but the offering the program retirement community will be beneficial to the elderly population. The physical activities improve cognitive function and promote physical well-being and activities for frail older adults or individuals suffering from chronic health conditions.

Why I chose the Program

The elderly will undergo a training session lasting between 8-10 weeks that help in improving aerobic capacity, body strength and reduce lower extremity pain and stiffness. The program will promote exercise participation and reduce caloric expenditure. Further, participants will have the courage to take personal exercising programs and due to reduced fear of injury. Exercise classes in combination with health promotion education help in improving levels of physical activity, attitude towards exercises and enhancing physical and mental health (National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2008)

Benefits of Participating in this Program

Retirement community residents participating in the social, educational and physical activity programs have improved physical and mental health outcomes. The programs play an essential role in reducing lowliness, minimizing social isolation, improving life quality and emotional well-being among the elderly residents (Zimring et al. 2005). The participants of activities benefit the elderly due to improved social engagement (Noice et al 2014). The fear of death decreases and the physical activity programs have shown the reduction in falls, improved body strength and balance and walking performance. The program reduces stress and chances of falling into depression (Noice et al 2014).

Resources needed to Implement the Program

The retirement communities require resources for successful implementation of the physical activity program. The National Council on Aging (NCOA) offers the medical guidelines towards delivering physical activity and best practices to healthcare professionals. The patients have the physical activities prescription to individuals suffering from chronic illness and maintaining physical well-being. The medical partnership with the retirement community and medical professional are required to improve physical activity opportunities to patients and the elderly population.

Measuring Outcomes

The retirement community can use upper-body flexibility distance walking, body mass index, depression, and quality of life to measure physical activity outcomes. A back starch test is an important tool in assessing the upper-body flexibility. The participants can use both hands to reach their backs. The participants can bend down and try to reach the toes with stretched hands. Additionally, the participants can walk for several minutes and measure their endurance. Those who walk long distances indicate body improvement and response to exercises.

The physical exercises aimed at reducing the overweight and obesity among the older population. The Body Mass Index (BMI) becomes an important tool in measuring physical activity program outcomes. The caregivers measure the height and compare it with the body weight. A higher BMI index indicates that the individuals are overweight and the exercises are not effective. Other than focusing on physical activity program, the caregivers can resolve to use the nutritional program to check on the body weight.

The health-related quality of life measurement is crucial to the elderly well-being. The retirement community can use the SF-36 health survey to assess the physical functioning, bodily pain, physical and emotional health. The score scale ranges between 0 (weak) and 100 (excellent). Finally, it is important to measure the depression among the elderly. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) helps in measuring participants’ emotions and feelings in the previous weeks. The caregivers assess the effectiveness of physical activities in reducing stress and depression and adjust where necessary.

References

Costello, E., Kafchinski, M., Vrazel, J., & Sullivan, P. (January 01, 2011). Motivators, Barriers, and Beliefs Regarding Physical Activity in an Older Adult Population. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, 34, 3, 138-147.

In Edwards, A., & In Leicht, A. (2014). The science of sport, exercise and physical activity in the tropics.

McArdle, W. D., Katch, F. I., & Katch, V. L. (2010). Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and human performance. Philadelphia, Pa: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (U.S.). (2008). Preventing falls: How to develop community-based fall prevention programs for older adults. Atlanta, Ga: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

Screening for and Prescribing Exercise for Older Adults. (January 01, 2006). Geriatrics and Aging, 9, 3, 174-182.

Zimring, Craig M., Harris-Kojetin, Lauren, Kiefer, Kristen, & Joseph, Anjali. (2005). Encouraging Physical Activity Among Retirement Community Residents – The Role of Campus Commitment, Programming, Staffing, Promotion, Financing, and Accreditation. Georgia Institute of Technology.

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